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  • Caregiver for my mum (no reactions)

    31.8.2016 10:24
    Hi all, My mom is an Alzheimer's patient and due to some personal circumstances, I'm unable to take care of her. After my dad's death, she usually stays alone at the house and I wonder what she'll do if her health condition becomes worse. While browsing, I had noticed that Prestige care ( http://www.prestigecare.com/assisted.php?id=112 ), an assisted living elderly care near her house provides live-in nannies. I already contacted them and they ensured me that they will provide 100% nursing care. But I'm confused..should I proceed with this or look up for any alternative solutions? Please help me take a decision.
  • what is being done to harness this & to support them through difficulties ?
  • If you have any experience in treatment of non obstructive azospermia please send me thanks
  • encouraging womeh to participate more (no reactions)

    Dr SANDYCLYNE sandraclyne@msn.com
    4.3.2016 21:30
    HOW can we do this ??
  • I am absolutely enthusiastic about Active80+ project. they really inspired me.and will try what I can do to discuss it in public whenever I can. Some days ago one of our students turned to me saying :"Now, you might be interested. I am turning 80. I have been with Slovenian third Age University for 15 years now". Only recently she discovered she was talented for architecture and urban space photographing. Her study group Squares, streets and buildings around us published Personal Town Tours a different kind of guide of Ljubljana based on research, personal stories of inhabitants. She also co-set up an exhibition titled 48 ouf of 1623... which has to do with studying the names of the streets and their location in urban space, which in turn opened up the topic of social fairness in urban space and the gender topic, But let me get to the point. She argues that active older citizens who turn 80+ are being ever less understood by their peers and are loosing contact with their generation. Would it be that the most important gap will not be between generations as they claim, but between older people who are active and those who are not? I would appreciate and would be interested in your opinion. I am absolutely enthusiastic about your partnership project Active 80+. You really inspired me and I think I'll be talking about it in a few days in Brescia... and will try what I can to discuss it in public whenever I can. I really want to. Some days ago one of our students turned to me saying :"Now, you might be interested. I am turning 80. I have been with Slovenian third Age University for 15 years now". Only recently she discovered she was talented for architecture and urban space photographing. Her study group Squares, streets and buildings around us published Personakl Town Tours a different kind of guide of Ljubljana based on research, personal stories of inhabitants. She also co-set up an exhibition titled 48 ouf of 1623... which has to do with studying the names of the streets and their location in urban space, which in turn opened up the topic of social fairness in urban space and the gender topic, But let me get to the point. She argues that active older citizens who turn 80+ are being ever less understood by their peers and are loosing contact with their generation. Would it be that the most important gap will not be between generations as they claim, but between older people who are active and those who are not? What about the right of very old people to continue to learn and be engaged in creative and meaningful processes?
  • The text below is taken from a Word Document. To download a Word version of this text, please visit the ForAge homepage. One of the initial concerns of the ForAge network was the lack of regular, consistent and comprehensive pan-European statistics showing the participation of people in education programmes using criteria such as age. The ForAge network believed they were needed for many reasons including the following: • To enable comparisons between different European countries • To show changes over time • To provide data on participation according to different criteria, such as age and gender • To enable comparison of participation rates against population data to reveal the proportion of people in different age bands who are taking part in later-life learning • To provide the data necessary for informed discussions about public policy and practice and funding priorities In some countries, good data on participation have been available for some time and this has enabled us to see changes that have occurred and to reflect on their possible causes. The ForAge project expressed the wish at the outset of the network to see comprehensive European data on lifelong learning by age groups to be made widely available. The project suggested that there should be a standardisation of the data, for example in the use of the same age bands, to permit comparisons across data sets. In some ways, the development of Eurostat data has helped to solve the problems. Data on participation rates are now regularly available and it is possible, for example, to obtain evidence of the low levels of participation of older people (aged 50+) in adult education. The position varies a great deal across Europe and depends on various factors. These include whether there is a well-established traditions of adult education, the economic circumstances of individual states, whether countries are emerging from social conflict, differences between rural and urban contexts, and whether there are low levels of adult literacy. These variations, which exist within as well as between countries, make analyses of the Grundtvig programme even more vital as the programme has benefited large numbers of older people in different locations. The practical experiences of how the older people were reached and what they achieved are clearly of great importance and value to others wishing to reach similar target groups of people. In the recent past it has often been difficult to provide statistical evidence to show that there is inequality amongst later-life learning provision, but the new statistical data now lends supports to these arguments. Eurostat participation and population data collected in 2012 indicated that only 1 person in every 25 people participating in lifelong learning within the (then) 27 EU states was aged 65 or more. This low level of participation is all the more telling as increasing evidence of the health, social, economic and personal benefits of learning is now emerging. The most recent Eurostat publication looking at quality of life issues (published in June 2015) adds to the evidence: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/3217494/6856423/KS-05-14-073-EN-N/742aee45-4085-4dac-9e2e-9ed7e9501f23 The figures assess the impact of educational participation and achievement on health and well-being, self-perception, and the capacity to seek assistance or discuss personal matters. The data refer to people aged 25 to 74 years of age and do not provide any further break-down of participants based on their age. The results suggest there are many widespread benefits for adults who participate in lifelong learning and education. The section on health also indicates that later life produces a decline in self-perception of good health amongst many people. This seems to prove the importance of the adage ‘It is never too late to learn!’ What is problematic is making the link between learning in later life and improved health, even though the evidence in my mind is clear. The question remains: ‘where is THAT evidence?’
  • ICT skills and older people (no reactions)

    20.4.2015 20:50
    The digital Danube is a new Erasmus K1 project run by Slovenian Third Age University and Open University Zagreb. One of the findings is that the old stereotypes about olde people's low ICT skills should be eradicated. In both institutions there is a high demand for advanced computer programmes. In Slovenian film Good to go for instance older people's ICT training is being shown as really basic; switching on computer, handling the mouse....Can anybody tell more about the ICT needs in older people today? Thank you.
  • Older people in Erasmus (no reactions)

    30.3.2015 11:36
    Yes, you are right older people are not explicitly mentioned as learners, community development and building of democratic relationships are absent as well but they can be brought in (not as learners) but as beneficiaries of certain topics dealt with.
  • ForAge's latest newsletters available from the ForAge home pages discuss how English is used across Europe today. The questions raised range from how English is used in pan European projects through to how, why and when older people learn English. ForAge is alwaays looking for information to better inform our debates and we are particularly interested in older learners' experiences- not only in learning and using English - but in the whole question of learning languages in later life. Pleaase read our newsletters and let us know what you think about the issues.
  • Older people in the Erasmus+ programme (1 reaction)

    10.2.2015 11:09
    In the previous funding period of the Lifelong Learning programme (2007 – 2013) older people formed part of the main target group. Referring to the demographic change in Europe there were many different opportunities to actively include older people as learners into projects and mobilities, not at least through the Senior Volunteering Programme. In the ForAge database many of these projects are listed with further links to relevant websites. In 2014 the new funding period started and will be relevant for the next seven years. The new Erasmus+ programme brought significant changes and on the first sight it seems that elderly people are suddenly excluded from the programme, as they are nearly nowhere explicitly mentioned and the programme focuses more on younger people. So, what about older people in the new Erasmus+ programme?
  • FILMS AND OLD AGE STEREOTYPES (no reactions)

    1.2.2015 11:53
    Are stereotypes about old age and older people's abilities in featured films necessary? CINAGE European film for active ageing is a FaceBook page with many visitors and followers. It brings news and opinions on film and film making and old age. It struggles against old age stereotypes vehicled by films and deals with new social roles for older people, roles developing several competencies: financial-economic, emotional, learning competence etc. In CINAGE courses the participants learned that a featured, especially a short featured film has to dwell on stereotypes. It is practically impossible to make a featured film not using them if one wants the film to have an understandable message.
  • games and learning (2 reactions)

    18.1.2015 21:47
    Has Forage been looking at the many new games on line which can be used for brain training for seniors?
  • In the framework of CINAGE European cinema for active ageing project supported by the European Commission, have been conducting and attending a CINAGE course for adult educators and older students. The course is meant for us to get familiar with different active ageing policies (WHO, OECD and the European Commission) and definitions focusing on a number of active ageing competencies as they appear in European films. But do they appear? A small scale research preceding the CINAGE course has revealed that older age is still being portrayed through numerous old age stereotypes (primitive thinking schemes), whereas for today’s active ageing several competencies are needed. There are emotional competence, civic competence, economic and financial competence, health and learning competence, intergenerational competence and some others. All of them are important for analysing the role of European cinema in encouraging older people to take on a variety of new post modern social roles. It seems that older people ever more continue living their lives without experiencing a major interruption after retirement. They create new social networks, they learn … A group of young students from the Academy of Theatre, Radio, Film and Television, University of Ljubljana joined older students at Slovenian Third Age University. When does intergenerational learning happen? Could older people learn together with younger people if they all assume interchangeable roles of teachers and students? What is needed for mutual, cooperative and reciprocal learning?
  • Intergenerational Learning (1 reaction)

    Valerie Wood-Gaiger valwoodgaiger@btinternet.com
    9.1.2015 16:06
    http://youtu.be/DjaLBx-Cnhc Talking about Intergenerational Learning Oct 2014
  • Non-learners and learning for inclusion (2 reactions)

    25.11.2014 16:48
    In the project MATURE report loacted at http://matureproject.eu/research-report one can find data regarding participation of older people in learning. The results are not optimistic. What can we do in order to make their participation more broader? We have started a dedicated discussion on FB at the address https://www.facebook.com/pages/Forage-for-later-life-learning-building-on-European-experience/447577198673523 How about icluding more activities voluntary based?
  • Older people and art (1 reaction)

    11.11.2014 10:53
    Why do older students often choose painting, drawing, plastic arts or music as their preferred study subject or learning activity ? Why are they so readily involved in cultural tourism? Is it because art brings a possibility to reflect upon one's life and experience, is it because it means being creative and therefore independent, is it because it is clearly transformative?
  • Older people and art (1 reaction)

    11.11.2014 10:53
    Why do older students often choose painting, drawing, plastic arts or music as their preferred study subject or learning activity ? Why are they so readily involved in cultural tourism? Is it because art brings a possibility to reflect upon one's life and experience, is it because it means being creative and therefore independent, is it because it is clearly transformative?
  • Older people and art (no reactions)

    11.11.2014 10:53
    Why do older students often choose painting, drawing, plastic arts or music as their preferred study subject or learning activity ? Why are they so readily involved in cultural tourism? Is it because art brings a possibility to reflect upon one's life and experience, is it because it means being creative and therefore independent, is it because it is clearly transformative?
  • Intergenerational learning (1 reaction)

    31.7.2014 16:02
    The GATE Grundtvig Learning Partnership [Progn. 2012-1-GB2-GRU06-08455-2] examined current practice in respect of learning opportunities for older people that promoted and enhanced active ageing. Inevitably this examination involved intergenerational and mutual learning. As a consequence the partnership produced the GATE Guide to Active Ageing available at - http://gate.wikispaces.com. However there are two questions which the partnership wishes to raise about this form of learning which is now very popular across Europe but still needs some reflection. 1). There have been many intergenerational learning opportunities, projects and networks in recent years but fewer focussing on mutual aspects of ageing or shared learning around ageing. Do you feel that that the claims that such experiences do bring benefits to our society have been justified? 2). This is a time of rapid change, economic uncertainty, a large reliance on technology, the emergence of social media as our main communication channels, and an apparent lessening of trust in politicians and decision makers at local, regional, national and pan European levels. Can you suggest ways (and provide examples) of how active ageing initiatives and strategies are (or can be) effective in allowing all members of our communities cope with these changes and remain economically and socially active?
  • How can education of older adults be transformed into inter-generational education.?